The Lone Gamer’s Tekken 7 PC Review: Best PC Fighter Ever!

Posted in DLC, Fan Service, Fighting Games, Game Advertising, Gaming, mods, PC Gaming, Tekken, Tekken 7 on June 18th, 2017 by thelonegamer


Fighting has never looked this good.

It’s been several years since the last release of a numbered, canon chapter of the King of Iron Fist Tournament, AKA Tekken. Tekken 6 was released for consoles waaaay back in 2009. Now, eight years later, is Tekken 7 the game that we’ve been waiting for? Is it the Tekken we need and deserve? Hell YES it is.

Graphically speaking, Tekken 7 is phenomenally gorgeous. Running 60FPS on 1080p resolution, this fighting game is truly a superior port of the arcade game, with huge characters onscreen with luscious detail from head to toe. Fighting moves are textbook Tekken, from meaty blows to bone-crunching throws. What appears to be excellent optimization ensures pretty much that a decent gaming PC will run this game well, as a solid 60FPS is integral to proper and decent Tekken 7 gameplay. But if you can, I say upgrade your old rig with a good, solid graphics card and you’re good to go.

The Single Player experience is, of course, my main interest and for the most part, Tekken 7 delivers a meaty package. There’s a solid roster comprising of classic returning fighters and several newcomers. So aside from the ever-present Heihachi Mishima and Paul Phoenix, you’ve got fresh-faced newbies like the sassy Katarina- a Brazilian martial artist who doesn’t practice Capoeira, instead using the French kickfighting art of Savate. Then there’s the controversial (for a while) Lucky Chloe, a blonde, petite Japanophile and mascot complete with a neon pink costume and a tail. Claudio Serafino is an Italian exorcist, Shaheen an Arabian security specialist and bodyguard, while Josie Rizal is an Escrima fighter and model(!) from the Philippines who kicks hard but cries even harder. Then there’s Gigas, a massive top-heavy armored bruiser and experimental bioweapon. Finally, Kazumi Mishima is Heihachi’s late wife and a powerful fighter in her own right.
As always, the Tekken roster is full of interesting characters, and you have to be truly finicky to not find a favorite to gravitate to.

That said, the roster harkens a bit to the controversial Tekken 4 slightly in that several classic fighters have so far failed to return- fans of Julia Chang and Lei Wulong, as well as Nina William’s rival and sister Anna will surely be peeved. I am quite surprised at the exclusion of Zafina- being that she is the only new fighter from Tekken 6 that failed to return for a second bout.

Central to the home version is the Cinematic Story Mode- which seems similar to the offerings of other contemporary fighting games. However, the ‘Mishima Saga’, as the mode has been called, is much shorter and smaller in scope than the world-beating, globe-hopping story modes of games like Injustice 2, Streetfigher V or even Dead or Alive 5. Instead of taking the effort to cram everyone in the roster into the narrative, the Saga mainly deals with the history of the Mishima rivalry- between Heihachi Mishima and his son, Kazuya. Told by a rather bland, nameless reporter, the narrative tries to explain the origins of the conflict, specifically explaining why Heihachi committed the act of basically trying to murder his own son and heir so many years ago. What caused the death of his young, beloved wife, who coincidentally died at the same time?

The most that can be said about the Story Mode is that it definitely is interesting, and ends with a true, decisive and rather final ending- though it remains to be seen how this will affect the game’s plotlines moving forward. It does make for some rather irritating boss fights against mega-powered enemies that will take you either a lot of practice or a high level of cheapness.

But perhaps the worst aspect of the Mishima Saga is that, as it centers on the Mishima Family, pretty much everyone else is glossed over. So most of the rest of the roster receives some of the shortest, worst endings EVER in the history of the franchise. These ‘Character Episodes’ are one-scene segments that barely tell any story or conclusion, and often comprise of the fighter and his/her rival talking a bit, or a single bit of action. Where are the cool, funny, weird, awesome or awesomely weird or funny endings from Tekkens past?

Once you finish Story Mode, you’ll probably get busy with Treasure Battle and Character Customization. Treasure Battle is basically the new version of the classic Ghost Battle mode, but this time your main reason for fighting customized CPU opponents is to earn gold or unlocking customization items to deck out or dress up your favorite fighter. As with the more recent Tekken games such as Tekken 6 or Tekken Tag 2, the customization items vary from common clothing items that are universal to most fighters to a few unique pieces and a TON of silly ornaments or accessories, and items that can be used to cause an effect or special attack in matches. While most of the customizations from the arcade version are included, there are many missing items and outfits that are expected to be added as additional DLC.

All in all, Tekken 7 is a superior home port of the latest King of Iron Fist Tournament. Loading times are relatively fast and the deep fighting action is easy to get into, but will take lots of practice to master. A good, solid internet connection will allow you to play online although there have been issues that the Tekken devs are still ironing out. As it is though, I reckon that this Tekken is easily the best home port so far in terms of graphics and gameplay. Content-wise, it can be better, and hopefully will when more stuff is added in the months ahead. If you’re a fighting game fan, this is one of the best fighting games you can get today. If you’re a Tekken fan, well, odds are you already have it.

Tekken 7 is out now for PC, PS4 and XBox One.